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Malevolent

U.S. Dept. Of Justice Deals Crushing Blow To Songwriters

15 posts in this topic

Everyday they find something new they can screw-up and control.  Slowly the freedoms and control are wrestled away from the people.

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Don McLean forever memorialized Feb. 3, 1959—the date of the plane crash killing Buddy Holly, Ritchie Valens, and J. P. “Big Bopper” Richardson—as “the Day the Music Died” in his song “American Pie.” If you ask most songwriters or music creators, June 30, 2016—the date the Dept. of Justice ruled on music licensing consent decrees—may go down in history as “the day the music rolled over in its grave.”

How severe are the rulings by the Dept. of Justice? “This would create Armageddon in the professional songwriter community,” Nashville Songwriters Association (NSAI) Executive Director Bart Herbison said in a press release. “I am stunned and sickened [by the ruling],” NSAI President Lee Thomas Miller added. “DOJ did not take the impact on songwriters into account when issuing this ruling.”

Songwriting and music licensing is one of the most strongly regulated areas in entertainment, dating back to pre-World World II policies put in place by the federal government to control how the two largest performing rights societies (PROs), ASCAP and BMI, can license music. It goes without saying that the music industry is entirely different today than it was 60 years ago…or even six years ago. Streaming services, in particular, have greatly disrupted the industry and led to tremendous declines in the revenue paid to songwriters. However, songwriters’ hands are mostly bound, because the federal government’s Consent Decree mandates how songwriters can be paid.<SNIP>

 

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The Federal government doesn't want just any song 🎶 out there to fall on the public's ears.

Propaganda through media needed to take precedence over all other entertainment sources.

Particularly from garden variety musicians.

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What? People write songs? :roflmao:

Is that what you call that noise emanating from the radio? Mu-sick, more like. Today's "artists" can't carry a tune in a bucket. 

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33 minutes ago, grav said:

What? People write songs? :roflmao:

Is that what you call that noise emanating from the radio? Mu-sick, more like. Today's "artists" can't carry a tune in a bucket. 

Ain't technology grand? I'll take the soulful R & B artists from the 50s and 60s any day over what's being produced today. Back then they actually had to sing to get a record deal.

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29 minutes ago, grav said:

What? People write songs? :roflmao:

Is that what you call that noise emanating from the radio? Mu-sick, more like. Today's "artists" can't carry a tune in a bucket. 

Max Martin, birth name Martin Karl Sandberg, won the ASCAP Songwriter of the Year award for the sixth consecutive year and for the ninth time in his career.

As of February 2015, Martin had had a total of 54 songs reach the top ten charts, placing him above Madonna's 38, Elvis Presley's 36 and the Beatles's 34.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Max_Martin

Written songs
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Max_Martin_production_discography#Written_songs

There is a lot of fantastic music being written and produced today but you won't hear it on the radio.
Alternative or underground musician make most of their money selling products at live shows now.

@9:00 Be sure to buy our illegal CD's.

 

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42 minutes ago, Lucy Barnable said:

@9:00 Be sure to buy our illegal CD's.

 

 

These guys love music and for them it isn't about getting rich. That's the difference between real musicians and the music industry.

Are you aware of the impact of casinos as far as raising the standard of living for the reservations? I haven't researched it. I wonder if building them turned out to be the great red savior or if the principles are just as greedy as everyone else. It would be great if the jobs are real jobs and not slave labor.

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2 hours ago, YourMom2 said:

These guys love music and for them it isn't about getting rich. That's the difference between real musicians and the music industry.

Are you aware of the impact of casinos as far as raising the standard of living for the reservations? I haven't researched it. I wonder if building them turned out to be the great red savior or if the principles are just as greedy as everyone else. It would be great if the jobs are real jobs and not slave labor.

Yes, true musicians, like other artist, do it because they have to; not necessarily because they want to.

The tribes who operate casinos have made the ones at top rich but have done little to elevate the people on the reservations.

The Myth of Indian Casino Riches

If I had a nickel for every time someone asked me about receiving money from Indian casinos, I might be relatively rich. No such luck. Non-Native people generally assume Indians are getting rich from tribal casinos, and often engage in intensive question-and-answer sessions when challenged. People have difficulty reconciling public myth with factual information, especially about a subject so politicized. In my opinion, lack of knowledge combined with the complexity of federal-state-tribe relations contribute to common misconceptions about Indian gaming.
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A 2008 government report emphasizes, “One final characteristic of gaming under IGRA should be noted because it is so often overlooked in the public conceptions of Indian gaming: Indians do not have the right to offer gaming. Tribes do. Indian gaming is not ‘privilege for one group of citizens.’ It is a power of government.”

The common myth about Indian Casino Riches goes a little something like this:

Every tribe has a casino in which every Indian has a job—if the Indian wants one. But why would the Indian want to work when every Indian gets lots and lots of money from the profits of the casino?

Here are the facts:

http://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com/2012/06/23/myth-indian-casino-riches

Greed, Corruption and Indian Country's New Welfare States

Indian country’s pecuniary advancements created by Indian gaming are well documented. Many tribes have taken full advantage of expanding and diversifying business ventures that now represent a sustainable economic base far greater than their initial casino enterprise. Such planning and financial discipline is commendable. Strong tribal leadership and the willingness to do what is in the best interest of the citizenry of those governments is usually the common thread of success for those tribes. Many times, however, decisions made by tribal councils to obtain such successful economic diversity come at a political price: risking their leadership positions by standing up to their constituents and saying no to either initiating per capita payments, or increasing them beyond sensible levels.

Unfortunately, many tribes today have lost that astute fiscal resolve. In its stead, per capita has become something so adverse amongst so many of our people that it now serves to hinder, disrupt and in some instances, even dismantle tribal governments. Disenrollment, political turmoil, government breakdowns, corruption, financial dependency and absolute greed has become the new “norm” for too many gaming tribes. I’ve witnessed more times than I care to admit, general councils literally holding tribal councils political hostage over per capita distributions. Chants of: “either pay us more per capita, or we’ll vote you out and replace you with someone who will” has become commonplace within many tribal communities. Sound familiar?

http://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com/2013/06/27/greed-corruption-and-indian-countrys-new-welfare-states

 

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@Lucy Barnable I was afraid it was something like that. You just can't get away from greed. Maybe Ken Burns should doe another fair and unbiased documentary about the Indians /sarc

Wikipedia thinks casinos are a good thing.

Today, many Native Americans satisfy a different kind of demand with the associated trades of their gaming casinos on sovereign land. These have been developed as entertainment and conference resorts, serving a wide market of customers, and generating substantial revenues for tribes to use for economic development, as well as welfare and education of their people.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Indian_Trade

So, America is infected with the culture of greed where everything is marked and owned like toe tags at the morgue. Ha! The cell just gets smaller after death. There was some house tour show where they went inside some rapper's crib that was overtly posh and I thought, gee couldn't this guy with all that swag just given away ONE song as a freebie? You know, as a thank-you to all the fans. I wonder if all the BAND-AID concerts were actually helping anyone or if that was just a gimmick to collect funds for the top tier. I rarely rent DVDs anymore but the piracy warning always pissed me off.....not that they don't deserve to make a profit off their film but it just screamed MINE MINE MINE like 5 year old children do.

 

 

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19 hours ago, grav said:

What? People write songs? :roflmao:

Is that what you call that noise emanating from the radio? Mu-sick, more like. Today's "artists" can't carry a tune in a bucket. 

Precisely why I hate being a dj in 2016. I've personally watched music decline since I started with this hobby in 1990 at age 10. Today's pop and hip hop is all about; money, bitches, drugs, partying, that's it no substance at all in the music anymore. Heck even hip hop in the 90's gave message of realism to the people, it was something that kids in the ghetto could actually look up to, they talked about real issues. Then something changed in the industry around id say 2005 or maybe a little earlier all music since then has been crap. I love electronic dance music but this crap that's out these days, I wouldn't even call it noise. 

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42 minutes ago, Groove said:

Precisely why I hate being a dj in 2016. I've personally watched music decline since I started with this hobby in 1990 at age 10. Today's pop and hip hop is all about; money, bitches, drugs, partying, that's it no substance at all in the music anymore. Heck even hip hop in the 90's gave message of realism to the people, it was something that kids in the ghetto could actually look up to, they talked about real issues. Then something changed in the industry around id say 2005 or maybe a little earlier all music since then has been crap. I love electronic dance music but this crap that's out these days, I wouldn't even call it noise. 

At a wedding I attended last month the dj played 2 or 3 real songs -- Otis Redding, Elvis. Other than that, it was oh oh oh, bump grind tribal dancing and girls feeling each other up and down. Creepy, made no sense. This is not natural. It uses sound technology to dumbify the few brain cells young people have left. 

And I remember the furor when Bob Dylan went from acoustic to electric! How far we've come. Down.

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19 hours ago, YourMom2 said:

@Lucy Barnable I was afraid it was something like that. You just can't get away from greed. Maybe Ken Burns should doe another fair and unbiased documentary about the Indians /sarc

Wikipedia thinks casinos are a good thing.

Today, many Native Americans satisfy a different kind of demand with the associated trades of their gaming casinos on sovereign land. These have been developed as entertainment and conference resorts, serving a wide market of customers, and generating substantial revenues for tribes to use for economic development, as well as welfare and education of their people.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Indian_Trade

So, America is infected with the culture of greed where everything is marked and owned like toe tags at the morgue. Ha! The cell just gets smaller after death. There was some house tour show where they went inside some rapper's crib that was overtly posh and I thought, gee couldn't this guy with all that swag just given away ONE song as a freebie? You know, as a thank-you to all the fans. I wonder if all the BAND-AID concerts were actually helping anyone or if that was just a gimmick to collect funds for the top tier. I rarely rent DVDs anymore but the piracy warning always pissed me off.....not that they don't deserve to make a profit off their film but it just screamed MINE MINE MINE like 5 year old children do.

That rap culture has infected almost every corner.

The hoop dancer in the video I posted above is Micco Sampson, son of Will Sampson who played the Indian in One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest.
He and his brother Sam Sampson (also a dancer and performing artist) are close to Frank Waln who is an outspoken Native activist and... rapper.

Sad.

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