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titanic1

Pyramids of Death: Teotihuacan, Mexico

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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y-zSNSny9aE

Pyramid of Death
At the Pyramid of the Moon in central Mexico, humans and animals were buried alive. Excavations reveal the remains of sacrifices once witnessed by thousands of spectators.

Located about 30 miles (50 kilometers) northeast of modern-day Mexico City, Teotihuacan was one of the largest urban centers in the ancient world. No one knows who built it. The city flourished between 2,100 years ago, when construction began, and about 1,400 years ago, when it went into a period of decline, including a fire that caused great damage. However, even with the decline, the city was never truly “lost” — the Aztecs made regular pilgrimages to the site in later periods.

 

What the city’s own inhabitants called the city and its structures is unknown. The current name, Teotihuacan, was given to it by the Aztecs and means “the place where the gods were created.”

Size and influence

At its zenith, Teotihuacan encompassed an urban core of about 8 square miles (20 square km) with a population estimated at more than 100,000 people. Its influence was felt throughout central Mexico and as far south as Guatemala.

The city was organized using a grid plan, many people living in what scholars refer to as “apartment compounds,” containing multiple families.  An archaeological mapping project identified about 2,200 of these structures within the city, with excavations showing that some compounds were richer than others, containing more stone and lime plaster in their construction.

Pyramid of the Moon

At the northern end of the avenue is the Pyramid of the Moon, from an Aztec name. Recent research suggests it was built in stages between around 1 AD and 350 AD. It started off as a small platform and eventually became a 150-foot-high (46 meters) pyramid with a base 550 feet (168 meters) by 490 feet (149 meters). Its elevated platforms were likely used for rituals that could be witnessed by people on the ground. Tombs found associated with the structure contain both human and animal sacrifices along with grave goods such as obsidian and greenstone.

Pyramid of the Sun

Less than half a mile south of the Pyramid of the Moon is the Pyramid of Sun. At a height of more than 200 feet (63 meters) and a base more than 730 feet (225 meters) long on each side, this pyramid is one of the largest structures created in the pre-Columbian New World. It would have been completed around 200 AD.

In 1971, an archaeological team discovered a tunnel underneath the pyramid, its entrance located near the Avenue of the Dead. They dug out the fill in the tunnel finding that it terminated in a cloverleaf shaped chamber which, sadly, had been looted in antiquity. The cave was likely used for rituals of some kind.

http://www.livescience.com/22545-teotihuacan.html


Even the ferocious Aztec were awed by their first glimpse of Teotihuacan. By the 13th century when the Aztec swept into central Mexico, the once teeming city—which reached its zenith around A.D. 400—had been long since abandoned by its mysterious builders. Its grand ceremonial center, where tens of thousands of people had gathered amid sacred monuments of stone, lay under thick green overgrowth. The Aztec gave the site its name and identified its most imposing features according to their own beliefs—the Pyramid of the Sun and Pyramid of the Moon. Assuming that some of the buildings were tombs, they called the main thoroughfare Street of the Dead.

They were, as it turns out, uncannily accurate. Burials both rich and gruesome have recently been discovered in the Pyramid of the Moon during excavations headed by Rubén Cabrera Castro, of Mexico's National Institute of Anthropology and History, and Saburo Sugiyama, of Japan's Aichi Prefectural University. Tunneling deep into the 140-foot-tall (43 meters) stone structure, the archaeologists located five burial sites. After most of the dirt and debris had been dug out, each site was reinforced with steel beams for safety. Supplied with fresh air pumped in from the outside, the archaeologists scraped the last layers of earth from the floor to reveal scenes of carnage: disembodied heads and the remains of foreign warriors and dignitaries, carnivorous mammals, birds of prey, and deadly reptiles.

Evidence indicates that all the victims were ritually killed to consecrate successive stages of the pyramid's construction. The earliest sacrifice, from about A.D. 200, marked a substantial enlargement of the building. A wounded foreigner, most likely a prisoner of war, was apparently buried alive with his hands tied behind him. Animals representing mythical powers and military might surrounded him—pumas, a wolf, eagles, a falcon, an owl, and rattlesnakes—some buried alive in cages. Finely crafted offerings included weapons of obsidian and a figurine of solid greenstone, perhaps a war goddess to whom the burial was dedicated. Each subsequent burial was different, but all had the same aim: "Human sacrifice was important to control the people," says Sugiyama, "to convince them to do what their rulers wanted."

https://mesoamerica-lost.blogspot.ca/2008/05/mexicos-pyramid-of-death-pyramid-of.html

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45 minutes ago, titanic1 said:

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y-zSNSny9aE

Pyramid of Death
At the Pyramid of the Moon in central Mexico, humans and animals were buried alive. Excavations reveal the remains of sacrifices once witnessed by thousands of spectators.

Located about 30 miles (50 kilometers) northeast of modern-day Mexico City, Teotihuacan was one of the largest urban centers in the ancient world. No one knows who built it. The city flourished between 2,100 years ago, when construction began, and about 1,400 years ago, when it went into a period of decline, including a fire that caused great damage. However, even with the decline, the city was never truly “lost” — the Aztecs made regular pilgrimages to the site in later periods.

 

What the city’s own inhabitants called the city and its structures is unknown. The current name, Teotihuacan, was given to it by the Aztecs and means “the place where the gods were created.”

Size and influence

At its zenith, Teotihuacan encompassed an urban core of about 8 square miles (20 square km) with a population estimated at more than 100,000 people. Its influence was felt throughout central Mexico and as far south as Guatemala.

The city was organized using a grid plan, many people living in what scholars refer to as “apartment compounds,” containing multiple families.  An archaeological mapping project identified about 2,200 of these structures within the city, with excavations showing that some compounds were richer than others, containing more stone and lime plaster in their construction.

Pyramid of the Moon

At the northern end of the avenue is the Pyramid of the Moon, from an Aztec name. Recent research suggests it was built in stages between around 1 AD and 350 AD. It started off as a small platform and eventually became a 150-foot-high (46 meters) pyramid with a base 550 feet (168 meters) by 490 feet (149 meters). Its elevated platforms were likely used for rituals that could be witnessed by people on the ground. Tombs found associated with the structure contain both human and animal sacrifices along with grave goods such as obsidian and greenstone.

Pyramid of the Sun

Less than half a mile south of the Pyramid of the Moon is the Pyramid of Sun. At a height of more than 200 feet (63 meters) and a base more than 730 feet (225 meters) long on each side, this pyramid is one of the largest structures created in the pre-Columbian New World. It would have been completed around 200 AD.

In 1971, an archaeological team discovered a tunnel underneath the pyramid, its entrance located near the Avenue of the Dead. They dug out the fill in the tunnel finding that it terminated in a cloverleaf shaped chamber which, sadly, had been looted in antiquity. The cave was likely used for rituals of some kind.

http://www.livescience.com/22545-teotihuacan.html


Even the ferocious Aztec were awed by their first glimpse of Teotihuacan. By the 13th century when the Aztec swept into central Mexico, the once teeming city—which reached its zenith around A.D. 400—had been long since abandoned by its mysterious builders. Its grand ceremonial center, where tens of thousands of people had gathered amid sacred monuments of stone, lay under thick green overgrowth. The Aztec gave the site its name and identified its most imposing features according to their own beliefs—the Pyramid of the Sun and Pyramid of the Moon. Assuming that some of the buildings were tombs, they called the main thoroughfare Street of the Dead.

They were, as it turns out, uncannily accurate. Burials both rich and gruesome have recently been discovered in the Pyramid of the Moon during excavations headed by Rubén Cabrera Castro, of Mexico's National Institute of Anthropology and History, and Saburo Sugiyama, of Japan's Aichi Prefectural University. Tunneling deep into the 140-foot-tall (43 meters) stone structure, the archaeologists located five burial sites. After most of the dirt and debris had been dug out, each site was reinforced with steel beams for safety. Supplied with fresh air pumped in from the outside, the archaeologists scraped the last layers of earth from the floor to reveal scenes of carnage: disembodied heads and the remains of foreign warriors and dignitaries, carnivorous mammals, birds of prey, and deadly reptiles.

Evidence indicates that all the victims were ritually killed to consecrate successive stages of the pyramid's construction. The earliest sacrifice, from about A.D. 200, marked a substantial enlargement of the building. A wounded foreigner, most likely a prisoner of war, was apparently buried alive with his hands tied behind him. Animals representing mythical powers and military might surrounded him—pumas, a wolf, eagles, a falcon, an owl, and rattlesnakes—some buried alive in cages. Finely crafted offerings included weapons of obsidian and a figurine of solid greenstone, perhaps a war goddess to whom the burial was dedicated. Each subsequent burial was different, but all had the same aim: "Human sacrifice was important to control the people," says Sugiyama, "to convince them to do what their rulers wanted."

https://mesoamerica-lost.blogspot.ca/2008/05/mexicos-pyramid-of-death-pyramid-of.html

Human sacrifice was important to control the people," says Sugiyama, "to convince them to do what their rulers wanted."

Sh!T hasn't changed much over a millennia.

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3 hours ago, titanic1 said:

The city flourished between 2,100 years ago, when construction began, and about 1,400 years ago, when it went into a period of decline

The historical dating seems questionable to me.

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Were these sacrifice stories just propaganda of the invading pseudo Christians?  It's a lot easier to subjugate a population considered barbaric.

What crazy stories can future generations claim about the crazy stuff we do with our dead?  Sewing eyes shut and putting metal hooks on eyeballs for torturing, placing people in comfortable boxes to only be buried alive, ripping out major organs and sewing the bunch back up into the chest cavity as some religious ceremony?

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