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titanic1

Danube Valley Civilization script is the oldest writing in the world

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[video=youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mFVTBZl81BM[/video]
 


The Danube Valley civilization is one of the oldest civilizations known in Europe. It existed from between 5,500 and 3,500 BC in the Balkans and covered a vast area, in what is now Northern Greece to Slovakia (South to North), and Croatia to Romania (West to East).
During the height of the Danube Valley civilization, it played an important role in south-eastern Europe through the development of copper tools, a writing system, advanced architecture, including two storey houses, and the construction of furniture, such as chairs and tables, all of which occurred while most of Europe was in the middle of the Stone Age. They developed skills such as spinning, weaving, leather processing, clothes manufacturing, and manipulated wood, clay and stone and they invented the wheel. They had an economic, religious and social structure.

danube-script-artefacts.jpg?itok=_Sjb8de

One of the more intriguing and hotly debated aspects of the Danube Valley civilization is their supposed written language.  While some archaeologists have maintained that the ‘writing’ is actually just a series of geometric figures and symbols, others have maintained that it has the features of a true writing system.  If this theory is correct, it would make the script the oldest written language ever found, predating the Sumerian writings in Mesopotamia, and possibly even the Dispilio Tablet , which has been dated 5260 BC.

http://www.ancient-origins.net/ancient-places-europe/danube-valley-civilisation-script-oldest-writing-world-001343

The symbols seen on numerous tablets from the Danube civilization are also called the Vinca symbols and are found across multiple archeological sites across the Danube Valley areas. The symbols have been found to be recorded on pottery, figurines, spindles and other clay artifacts.

The fact that the writing system developed by the Danube Valley Civilization is the oldest in the world is definitely a history changer. Not only is there evidence to support this theory present on clay tablets, but researchers have found thousands of artifacts with the Danube Valley Script on countless figurines. To date, researchers have found approximately 700 different characters in the Danube Valley Script, a number similar to the characters used in Ancient Egyptian Hieroglyphs.

danube-script-artefacts-2.jpg

The fact that mainstream archeologists suggest these symbols are not a writing system but mere decorations comes from the same inability to explain other findings across the globe. It seems that every time, something that challenges mainstream views on history and development of the human race is found, mainstream scholars close their eyes and decide to ignore it.

however, there are scholars who also suggest that the Danube Valley Civilization actually copied the symbols and writing system of Ancient Mesopotamia, claims that are absurd when you realize that some clay tablets from the Danube Valley Civilization are older than many clay tablets from ancient Mesopotamia.

http://www.ancient-code.com/this-is-the-oldest-writing-system-in-the-world-and-predates-ancient-sumerian-writing/

Edited by titanic1
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We are discovering our true history, inch by inch. It will take some time to absorb your link articles. Thanks.

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