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Malevolent

South Africa in a Nutshel - By Aljazeera

14 posts in this topic

  SA is going to be a huge participant in upcoming events, and people like that MP in the interview will have to be deposed.  Westerners have a difficult time understanding SA, because we have lost familiarity with tribal cultures.   That lady will NEVER entertain an accusation against someone in her own tribe no matter what representative government principles say she should do.  The black communities in SA are TRIBAL, first and foremost.  There are many tribes and they do not like each other.  Government positions are nothing more than an opportunity to hire all your family members and steal as much as they can get ...cuz' eff everyone not in my tribe.

I don't care who the president, prime minister or any  other govt. official is, if the TRIBAL head is a street sweeper in Johannesburg, that street sweeper will have more power and control over the population than the title bestowed on any government position.

I figured Raxoxane would weigh in on this one...  anyone from SA can correct me if I'm wrong :)    I know Rax is from SA and I'm curious to hear what a native has to say about  this gal :)

  

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8 hours ago, Jostler said:

  SA is going to be a huge participant in upcoming events, and people like that MP in the interview will have to be deposed.  Westerners have a difficult time understanding SA, because we have lost familiarity with tribal cultures.   That lady will NEVER entertain an accusation against someone in her own tribe no matter what representative government principles say she should do.  The black communities in SA are TRIBAL, first and foremost.  There are many tribes and they do not like each other.  Government positions are nothing more than an opportunity to hire all your family members and steal as much as they can get ...cuz' eff everyone not in my tribe.

I don't care who the president, prime minister or any  other govt. official is, if the TRIBAL head is a street sweeper in Johannesburg, that street sweeper will have more power and control over the population than the title bestowed on any government position.

I figured Raxoxane would weigh in on this one...  anyone from SA can correct me if I'm wrong :)    I know Rax is from SA and I'm curious to hear what a native has to say about  this gal :)

  

In Africa as a whole, the biggest scapegoats are "colonisation" and "apartheid" - this is simply to hide the actual issue which is tribalism!  Go research Rwanda - Sudan, CAR, DRC, Mozambique, Zimbabwe - and you will inevitably find that there is at the center of all politics a very strong force - tribalism.

In South Africa at the current moment the terrorist/liberating organization called ANC originally consisted of Xhosa tribesmen - Jacob Zuma took control of the organization and since then it has been flooded with his tribe - Zulu.  Almost all except a few "token" ministers have been replaced by Zulu people.

 

You are quite correct in stating that there will never be any accountability - any other excuse will be put forward and a lot of obfuscation (of which they are absolute masters) will happen.  It is a known fact that the ANC pay out an immense amount of tax-monies in social grants.  The unemployment is way past 32% - although with more obfuscation they have made the official figure around 23%. The statistics department of the government report a split in unemployment.  They differentiate between those without work but looking to find and those who have totally given up i.e. non-job seekers. So, only those still looking are technically "unemployed".

The ANC give an approximated 18 Million people grants.  These people are told on a daily basis that if they do not vote for the ANC their grants will be taken away.  They are told that any other party will immediately stop grants.  Further more they have a big propaganda machine which "instructs" people to vote ANC because they are the ones that liberated them from the evil whitey! Here is a measure of their success: In 1993 the Rand US$ exchange was 2.45 Rand to a US$ - Today it is [as at NOW()] - 15.06 Rand to a US$. 

 

Come Rax - add your bit! :JSfrXsb:

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Posted (edited)

Just some snippets - you be the judge!

 

This is the current president - singing Umshiniwami - http://mg.co.za/article/2007-12-23-umshini-wami-echoes-through-sa

 

Not very clever or intricate words - but very inflammatory

 

Zulu

Umshini wami mshini wami (lead)
khawuleth'umshini wami (Follower)
Umshini wami mshini wami,
khawuleth'umshini wami
Umshini wami mshini wami,
khawuleth'umshini wami
khawuleth'umshini wami
Wen'uyang'ibambezela(Lead)
umshini wami, khawuleth'umshini wami(Follower)

English (although these cannot be directly translated without knowing the origin and meaning it has to a terrorist)

My machine my machine (gun)
Please bring my machine (gun)
My machine my machine (gun)
Please bring my machine (gun)
My machine my machine (gun)
Please bring my machine (gun)
Please bring my machine (gun)
You're pulling me back
My machine, Please bring my machine [1]

 

Edited by FalkeAuge
Duplicate video deleted.

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1 hour ago, Cinnamon said:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nk_45WgQ9sw

Thanks @Cinnamon that just shows part of the last two weeks of "fun".

Jip, for us it is sort of "normal" we grew up with it.  It started in the 1970's when they started burning schools and then it escalated with bombings of civilian places like Magoo's Bar the list is long you can check it HERE - Today it is all about power and greed and in obtaining, keeping and abusing that power.

Funny thing is the liberal bastards who poured billions into the "liberation" organisation is now dead quiet about the atrocities they helped fund.

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3 minutes ago, FalkeAuge said:

Jip, for us it is sort of "normal" we grew up with it.  It started in the 1970's when they started burning schools and then it escalated with bombings of civilian places like Magoo's Bar the list is long you can check it HERE - Today it is all about power and greed and in obtaining, keeping and abusing that power.

Funny thing is the liberal bastards who poured billions into the "liberation" organisation is now dead quiet about the atrocities they helped fund.

I can't help but worry about you sometimes, FaulkAuge and Skycat, even though he's not here anymore. :(

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1 minute ago, Cinnamon said:

I can't help but worry about you sometimes, FaulkAuge and Skycat, even though he's not here anymore. :(

We all have our perils no matter where we are.  But thanks ! :2sMZZFw:

I read the story about the French Cop that was stabbed.  They have been too lackadaisical in their approach to life.  Here we are much more vigilant and always on the look-out.  We have quite good community policing forums (neighborhood watch) and the communities by and large are connected either by radio (two way) and WhatsApp etc.  Here we do not simply open a gate and drive out.  You observe the area first and if anything looks even remotely fishy you check with a neighbor etc.  All suspicious movement is reported and we investigate self - cops sometimes take two to four hours to arrive. 

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And you definitely do not want to go to prison in South Africa! - You think the streets are crazy - read this.

 

Quote

Allegations of murder, beatings, electrocutions and torture made against members of the prisons department's Emergency Support Team have earned the team the nickname "Boko Haram" among prisoners across the country.

Boko Haram is the murderous Islamic terrorist group that has destabilised much of Nigeria.

Members of the team have been implicated in the death of a Pretoria prisoner, and in assaulting and torturing 15 others.

Their four-year terror campaign at Pretoria's central prison, allegedly carried out with the complicity of top prison management, is now being investigated.

The assaults, and the death of murder convict Ricky Mokoena, 56, are among a string of allegations of beatings, electrocutions and torturing of scores of prisoners across South Africa linked to the Emergency Support Team, which, according to human-rights groups, have been covered up by prison officials.

In its 2014-2015 annual report, the Judicial Inspectorate for Correctional Services slammed the department's inaction against team members, several of whose assaults on inmates bordered, it said, on "gross human rights violations".

Adding to concern about the allegations against the Emergency Support Team members is the seeming indifference of the Department of Correctional Services to the judicial inspectorate's recommendation that the team's operations be reviewed.

Lawyers for Human Rights yesterday launched an investigation into the abuse of prisoners at Pretoria's Kgosi Mampuru II prison, which date back to 2011. The organisation has also asked the police to investigate.

Central to the investigations is a letter written by prisoners at Kgosi Mampuru II. <snip>

SOURCE

 

 

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The contrast between poor whites and rich blaks in South Africa

 

 

 

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From a different perspective - American girl - Annie Erickson

 

 

http://www.henrileriche.com/a-letter-from-an-american-living-in-south-africa-the-past-7-years/

 

“I confess that when I first moved to South Africa, I thought Afrikaners were the “bad guys”. Because I was never required to study African history in school, I knew only what the American media had taught me, which was that Afrikaners were responsible for Apartheid and therefore the bad guys. Six months after moving here, I realised how incorrect my initial assumptions were. Everyone in South Africa is both a “bad guy” and a “good guy”, and so it is with the rest of the world (for such is human nature).

The following two years were spent reading every book I could get my hands on regarding South Africa. If one wants to understand a culture, I reasoned, then one must study their art, music, literature, cuisine, and history. And so I did just that – not only for the Afrikaans culture, but for other South African cultures as well.

At the end of those two years, I felt a keen remorse for having been so arrogant in the beginning. I now knew enough to understand that I knew very little, if anything. I enrolled in university (again) to study pastoral counselling, with the intent of learning how to listen and ask better questions. After I finished my studies, I enrolled in another three-year programme to study spiritual accompaniment, which teaches one how to journey with people on a spiritual level as they wrestle with issues of faith. I have two years left of this course, which brings me to the present moment.<snip>

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